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Author Topic: What's 'Normal'?  (Read 6611 times)
Wings
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« on: February 26, 2014, 03:24:04 PM »

Recently I noticed the oil pressure readings on my car seemed to have dropped quite a bit. I'm not sure if its an engine issue or if it might just be the guage. (it's got a set of aftermarket guages). It has a pretty significnat oil leak but the dip stick indicates there's enough oil in the motor.

Any thoughts, ideas or suggestions?

Thanks
Paul
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2013 JCW Chili Red/Chili Red
1991 Mini Cooper Red/White 'Matchbox'
BritBits
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« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2014, 09:09:42 PM »

What kind of numbers are you seeing?

On my '63 Cooper with 997, cold pressure is about 100 psi.   Warm it drops to about 50 running and 20ish at idle.  I suspect the bearings were well worn before I got the car in 1992.

On the vintage racer with 1275S I seem to recall it'd run 50-60 running and 30 or so at idle.   

Cheers,

Jim
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Wings
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« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2014, 08:22:56 AM »

Until recently it used to run around 60-70 range when cold and then 50-60 when warm. Two weeks ago i noticed it had dropped all the way to 20-30 when warm. At idle it's much less than that.
It seemed like the change happened very quickly rather than a long slow decline.

Paul
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1991 Mini Cooper Red/White 'Matchbox'
MPlayle
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2014, 09:32:28 AM »

It could also be the pressure relief valve has gotten stuck partially open.  It is accessible on the front of the block.  Pull it out and check for gunk or grooves/ridges.  Clean it and lightly buff before reinstalling.  Check you pressure behavior again.  If still low, it could be either the oil pump or the bearings.  Bearing failure can be sudden.
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Wings
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« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2014, 12:11:23 PM »

It could also be the pressure relief valve has gotten stuck partially open.  It is accessible on the front of the block.  Pull it out and check for gunk or grooves/ridges.  Clean it and lightly buff before reinstalling.  Check you pressure behavior again.  If still low, it could be either the oil pump or the bearings.  Bearing failure can be sudden.


Thanks for the advice. It's still running well but of course that doesn't mean there aren't issues.
I know two cylinders are down on compression and the oil pan gasket has a leak that needs to be addressed. Sooner or later the whole engine needs to be gone through. I'm still looking for a shop that's familiar with the 1275 and can handle a rebuild. Recommendations are always welcome.

Thanks again for the tip.

Paul
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BritBits
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« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2014, 09:55:39 PM »

Are you looking for a shop that will take your old engine and with some time and lots of money hand you a good as new one?

You might try asking Lloyd Bullard over at British Auto Specialists in Haltom City.    Maybe he can take it on as a side job, if it goes through BAS it definitely won't be cheap.    Lloyd does use an 850 as a daily driver, so he knows his stuff.

Otherwise there are several good machine shops that can get the block/crank/rods/head ready.   Not much to the A series engine, the magic is mating it to the trans without getting leaks.

Cheers,

Jim
« Last Edit: March 08, 2014, 09:50:04 AM by BritBits » Logged
Wings
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« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2014, 04:51:06 PM »

... the magic is mating it to the trans without getting leaks.

Cheers,
Jim
Good point, Jim! The last guy didn't have that part of the rebuild figured out. Smiley

I wish I knew where I'm starting from in the first place. The previous owner didn't know much about what had/or hadn't been done internally. He indicated it had been 'hopped up' but there was no paperwork to confirm anything internal. Later I was told it looked like it has upgraded rocker arms so maybe it has a different cam, maybe not. It has a Weber on it but it's got a bit of a stumble and I doubt it's properly tuned. Add in the two cylinders down on compression and it becomes quite a mystery motor.

I'd like to get the engine rebuilt as needed to clean up the current issues and pick up a few horsepower along the way if possible. I've seen what places like Heritage Garage & Seven Mini get for rebuilt and upgraded engines. I'm not quite ready to spend that kind of cash, not to mention adding shipping and installation.

I met a gentleman at Cars & Coffee a few years ago who was showing his '66 Olds Toronado and his '66 Cooper (the only two front wheel drive cars sold in the US that year). He commented that he had good results autocrossing his Cooper. After winning at the Goodguys' event he had someone in Denton rebuild the motor and he was quite surprised by the increas in power. Of course I didn't think to get any details at the time.

Thanks for the suggestion. I'll give BAS a call.

Paul

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1991 Mini Cooper Red/White 'Matchbox'
BritBits
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« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2014, 06:42:28 PM »

It all a function of what you want/need done.   When I was rebuilding Spitfire engines, it used to be about $700-$900 for all the parts and machine work.  Basic stock type rebuild, nothing fancy.   

And I'm sorry, but in 1966, Citroen was selling DS19 Sedans, and possibly 2CVs and some of the 2CV based cars like the Ami.

I thought Fiat had some small FWD car at the time, too.

Saab is also FWD.

If he'd said "largest FWD engine and smallest FWD engine"... yeah... I might let that one slide Wink


Cheers,

Jim
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Wings
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« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2014, 09:57:31 AM »

The guy showed me a copy of a 1966 Road & Track magazine that had the Toronado and the Mini (both in while like his) on the cover. The article said they were the only two fwd cars sold in America. That's my only basis for the statment. Back in those days I doubt I even knew what a Mini was.  Smiley  Better late than never to the party, right?

Thanks again for your suggestions.

Paul
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2013 JCW Chili Red/Chili Red
1991 Mini Cooper Red/White 'Matchbox'
Wings
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« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2014, 07:40:08 AM »

It could also be the pressure relief valve has gotten stuck partially open.  ......

DING..DING..DING..DING..DING...!!!!! We have a winner.
You called it. The spring ws bad and after cleaning the valve and replacing the spring the oil pressure is back to 'normal'.

Thank you for the tip.

Paul
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2013 JCW Chili Red/Chili Red
1991 Mini Cooper Red/White 'Matchbox'
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